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Bethel School

Berlin Township Beers' 1872 "Atlas of Wayne County" shows School #4 next to The Wayne County Poor House. At one time the school was called Pigeon Roost School because of the pigeons on the roof of a barn nearby. This simple wooden structure has separate entrances and cloakrooms for boys and girls. The large single classroom has a high ceiling, slate boards, and the double wooden desks of the last century. It was originally heated by a large wood stove. It was the teacher's responsibility to bank the fire at night and arrive in time to warm the schoolhouse before the pupils came at nine o'clock. Many former students remember standing by the stove to dry clothing. Water was carried from the Poor Farm or a neighbor's home and lighting was at first "natural" and later provided by kerosene wall lamps. The teacher taught all eight grades and the number of students varied. Classes were called to the front recitation bench for lessons Former pupils recall playing Haley Over, marbles, and baseball during the long lunch hour and two recesses. Children could eat lunch in an apple tree, search the woods for trailing arbutus, and play in the creek. A large bell called them back to classes. Bethel School closed in 1951 with Mary McCarthy as teacher. This largely unchanged building is owned by Wayne County who repaired the foundation and painted the exterior prior to the Wayne County Historical Society opening it to the public on a regular basis in 1998. Historic Preservation Award given in 1998 to the County of Wayne for restoration of the exterior of this property.

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From 1993 through 2008 the Honesdale National Bank published an annual wall calendar, each featured 13 historic sites. The sites were chosen and researched by a committee of the historical society and artwork was commissioned to Judy Hunt and William Amptman by the bank.

This page was one month of the calendar and was made possible through the Wayne County Commissioners and a Tourism Promotion Committee’s Tourism Grant.