Home of the Stourbridge Lion Replica, The First Steam Locomotive To Run in America

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Hand-Kirkland Property

1111 Main Street, Honesdale, PA 1111 Main Street, known locally as the Gibbs House, was part of a tract of land sold by Jason Torrey to Ezra Hand and David P. Kirkland on January I, 1839. They were merchants in the new town and later sold the property to George Mayhew who is listed as owner on the 1872 Beers Atlas. Mayhew left the building to his daughter Dolly in 1906 and she in turn willed it to Harriet Many and Mary Russell. They gave it to Kate Geiseke and she sold it to William Gibbs in 1926. Charles Gibbs moved into the house that year and lived upstairs with his wife Inez. He was well known as a machinist, gunsmith, locksmith, and inventor. In 1903 Gibbs built an automobile, which he drove around town for years and he was also known for a steam-powered boat that he launched on the Lackawaxen. His shop in the back was a magnet for small boys looking for bicycle repairs and for a mechanical education. Inez Gibbs lived on in the house for twenty-five years after her husband's death and in 1970 willed the property to the Trustees of the Wayne County Library. It was the library until 1990 when the Trustees purchased Seven Maples at 1400 North Main. Tom Glinsky purchased 1111 Main, and it was included in the sale of his property to Wayne and Judith Stephens. It is now head-quarters of the Wayne Pike Chapter of the American Red Cross. The charming brick building still has the shop bay window and an entry porch with a paneled door, leaded glass transom and sidelights. A classic brick dentil cornice and a paned, circular window, adorn the facade. In the foyer are stairs with a walnut banister and spindles leading to the second floor apartment. This building is a beautiful reminder of our past and still a vital part of the ever-changing Main Street.

Text by Marge Hook, Sally Eno Soden, and Sally Talaga

Line Drawing by William Amptman

From 1993 through 2008 the Honesdale National Bank published an annual wall calendar, each featured 13 historic sites. The sites were chosen and researched by a committee of the historical society and artwork was commissioned to Judy Hunt and William Amptman by the bank.

This page was one month of the calendar and was made possible through the Wayne County Commissioners and a Tourism Promotion Committee’s Tourism Grant.