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The Bandstand at Bingham Park

Hawley The land that early in the nineteenth century was a canal basin for the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company became the property of the Pennsylvania Coal Company and a part of its transfer facilities. In 1918, the Pennsylvania Coal Company deeded land to Michael J. Monaghan and his wife Mary. In March of 1929, the Monaghans sold 5.51 acres of their land to Adelbert and Margaret Bingham who six days later donated the land to the Borough of Hawley. Their generous gift, along with $900, enabled the Borough of Hawley to move forward with plans for a park in the canal basin area. In 1932, the WPA (Works Progress Administration), constructed the bandstand and other structures in the park. They were all designed by C. G. Ellingsen of Hawley. The octagonal bandstand in the center of the park is forty feet across, with eight seven-sided wooden pillars. Broad steps lead into the bandstand from the center of the park. A wooden balustrade encloses the space. The Wayne Independent in 1933 notes several Hawley School band concerts in the park on Friday and Saturday evenings, and residents recall Sunday afternoon concerts in the 1940's given by the Old Timers Band with Frederick Swingle conducting. Today the bandstand is often used for weddings. showers, and birthday parties. Hawley natives recall skating on Teeter lake in the park when they were young. Floods removed the pipes that carried water to the small lake and it was later filled in. Stone walls still mark the era of the canal and boat basin. Bingham Park is a fine community asset with baseball diamonds, tennis courts, a playground, picnic tables, and a peaceful view of the river. The Bandstand is a symbol of Hawley"s past and its present, reminding us just how much land given to recreation and cultural activities enriches the lives of many generations. A brass plaque mounted on stone near the Bandstand states: Bingham Park This park. once flooded as a basin for canal boats on the Delaware & Hudson Canal. was purchased by Adelbert W. Bingham and donated by him and Margaret Bingham, his wife, to the Borough of Hawley, Pennsylvania. March 15,1929

Text by Marge Hook and Sally Eno Soden

Line Drawing by William Amptman

From 1993 through 2008 the Honesdale National Bank published an annual wall calendar, each featured 13 historic sites. The sites were chosen and researched by a committee of the historical society and artwork was commissioned to Judy Hunt and William Amptman by the bank.

This page was one month of the calendar and was made possible through the Wayne County Commissioners and a Tourism Promotion Committee’s Tourism Grant.