Home of the Stourbridge Lion Replica, The First Steam Locomotive To Run in America

< Previous | Browse | Next >

The Old Stone Silo - James Cutrone Farm

Buckingham Township A few miles north of Equinunk, on Route 191, is a well maintained farm with an old barn and a stone silo. The farm belongs to James Cutrone. He bought the property in 1971 from Wilford and Josephine Lavoie. The land in this area was extensively timbered. Deeds of 1880 show a sale of the property by Joseph Atkinson, sheriff, to W.W. Weston. Weston is well known for the W W. Weston Pottery in Honesdale and he also owned a tannery near Equinunk. One section of that sale included "five frame dwellings, three frame barns, apple orchard, out buildings, and other improvements." Whether it refers to the farm in question is not certain. A deed of March, 1914, when Margaret McGranaghan sold the properly to Robert Jaycox notes, "the same piece conveyed by W. W. Weston to James Gibson by deed of 1897, and said Margaret McGranaghan." It was purchased by Nathan Hartman in 1920, by Bruce Stephens in 1924. and later sold by his widow to Ralph and Betty Tracey. who sold to the Lavoies in 1951. Stone silos are uncommon in our area. Eric Sloane, - in his book "An Age of Barns", writes that Michigan claims the first stone silo built in America dated 1875, and says, "early stone models went as deep into the ground as they were high above it." Orvis Teeple remembers the silo from more than seventy years ago and believes it was old at that time. It is a beautifully constructed piece of history and a treasured part of Wayne County's past.

Text by Marge Hook, Sally Eno Soden, Gloria McCullough, and Ann O'Hara

Line Drawing by William Amptman

From 1993 through 2008 the Honesdale National Bank published an annual wall calendar, each featured 13 historic sites. The sites were chosen and researched by a committee of the historical society and artwork was commissioned to Judy Hunt and William Amptman by the bank.

This page was one month of the calendar and was made possible through the Wayne County Commissioners and a Tourism Promotion Committee’s Tourism Grant.