Home of the Stourbridge Lion Replica, The First Steam Locomotive To Run in America

< Previous | Browse | Next >

Zane Grey Museum

Lackawaxen Author Zane Grey purchased this house in Lackawaxen in 1914 from his brother Romer who had it built in 1906. Zane put two additions on the house to accommodate his writing and research. Zane Grey's widow sold the house in 1945 to a family friend, Helen James Davis. She used it as an inn for hunters and fishermen until 1970, and then she turned three rooms into a museum displaying Zane Grey memorabilia. After the National Park Service purchased the Zane Grey Museum in 1989 from Mrs. Davis, the house was painted the exact shade of forest green it was when the Grey family lived there. Zane Grey was born 1872 in Zanesville, Ohio. and received a baseball scholarship to the University of Pennsylvania where he earned a degree in dentistry in 1896. He gave up his dental practice in New York City shortly after his marriage, and the couple moved to a cottage in Lackawaxen in 1905. Grey's love of the outdoors inspired him to write sixty western novels. His most famous, Riders of the Purple Sage, was written in 1912 while he resided in Lackawaxen. He also achieved international acclaim as holder of ten world deep-sea-fishing records. Zane Grey died in 1939 while living in California, but Lackawaxen was chosen as the site of his final resting place.

Text by Marge Hook and Sally Eno Soden

Line Drawing by William Amptman

From 1993 through 2008 the Honesdale National Bank published an annual wall calendar, each featured 13 historic sites. The sites were chosen and researched by a committee of the historical society and artwork was commissioned to Judy Hunt and William Amptman by the bank.

This page was one month of the calendar and was made possible through the Wayne County Commissioners and a Tourism Promotion Committee’s Tourism Grant.